Thursday, March 26, 2009

Thursday is "This Old House" Day

[click image to enlarge]

Located on one of the most prominent sites on Forbes Hill, this impressive Tudor Revival style house at 95 Resevoir Road, was built in the 1930s at a cost of $9700 for Edwin S. White, president of White Bros. Milk, one of the largest dairy companies on the South Shore, and located in North Quincy. My father was a milkman for White Bros and this was part of his route so he must have delivered milk to the boss's house! What a fun discovery for the family history.

Did any of you ever get your milk delivered to your house? Crescent Ridge Dairy is the only company I know of that might still deliver in Quincy . . . what a help it was when the children were small.

The designer of this brick beauty was Boston architect Harry Morton Ramsay. He designed an asymmetrical facade whose dominant element is the picturesque granite faced tower with a conical roof. On the right is a projecting gabled wing which balances the long slope of the slate roof on the left which is pierced by a large hip dormer. There are only a few Tudor style houses in Quincy; this being a fine example.

12 comments:

DAG said...

Nice house. I remember White Brothers in North Quincy very well. When I was child we would ride our bikes over there by the Ice house and the men would give us slivers of ice to lick and suck on those hot summer days. Nice post, thanks for the memory

DAG said...

There is a local milk company in Milton. Thatcher Farms has been delivering milk for over one hundred years. The Manning family has been operating Thatcher Farms for all that time.

slim said...

DAG - Sometimes the obvious alludes as did "Thacher Farms" when I was writing this post. I used to live in the farm house on Thacher Street and should have remembered their dairy home delivery and the little store they ran out back. I hated getting woken up by the trucks going in and out . . . perhaps that is why I put them out of my mind.

brattcat said...

What a fabulous house! I grew up in Baltimore city, in a row house, and we had milk delivered to the doorstep when I was a very little girl. I remember the clink of the glass bottles and their paper hats and the little metal box that kept the milk protected until we came out of the house to fetch it. Thanks for asking that question.

MarilynB said...

I did not grow up in Quincy, but I remember the milkman coming to our house. He came three times a week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Milk only came in one quart glass bottles back then, and with four kids in the house, there were always two to three bottles in refrigerator.

Sarah said...

Beautiful house! We have a large tudor near here that's incredibly beautiful, however it's in the middle of the country----oddly placed. Nice though, nonetheless.

Have a great day! Thanks for sharing!

Sarah

Viewtiful_Justin said...

I adore houses in this style, the prettiest of which is in the town where I was raised. I should visit...

m_m said...

Beautiful! I like this architecture! Great photo!

Champ Townboy said...

Great post! Beautiful house and fantastic history. I had milk delivered by Hood - Jerry had the key and would put the milk right in the fridge for us.

Guy D said...

Great shot, thanks for sharing.

Have a great weekend!
Guy
Regina In Pictures

JR said...

My grandfather used to have a milk company McAdoo Milk (offical name Green Acres Farm)in Cambridge. I vaguely recall a newspaper add from the 60s featuring one of my brothers. Every once in a while I poke around online to see if I can find a bottle from the company that may be for sale on eBay or someplace, no luck so far.

Jo-Anna said...

I love the tudors in Quincy....